Revision

Standard

      virginia-birthday-45-to-47-copyI started to learn  to make digital scrapbook pages about eight months ago.  In spite of going through a tutorial and reading some books I got through the library, my first attempts to make digital pages were torturous.  I kept deleting things I was trying to save, and couldn’t do simple things like make a mat for a picture without spending an hour fussing around.  In frustration, I’d finally quit and not get back to it for days or weeks.   However, I had decided I wanted to learn this new skill, and so I perservered past the problems.   I still have a lot to learn, but the  revision took about half the time as the original layout.  

 

I really like this birthday layout I just finished.  It is a richer, more vibrant revision of one of my first attempts at digital scrapbooking:

1st-version-virginia-44-47-early-digital-scrapbooking-copy1

 

    I’ve been thinking about “Revision” and how it applies to our thought life too.    Yesterday, Maggie came home crying because of her music teacher.  They are getting ready for a regional choir contest and I think the teacher has her perspective too set on the result rather than  the process.  My job?  Helping Maggie to learn how to revise her thinking about this situation. What is the goal?  To learn to use your voice effectively so that you will be able to sing the rest of your life.  How important is the contest?  Not very.  You should do your best in everything you do but singing is just a hobby and a means to worship God, not your life. 

     Yet, I sometimes I don’t revise my own thinking appropriately.  In a previous post, I discussed the research on play and self-talk with toddlers.  I’m realizing lately how important it is to apply appropriate self-talk to myself.    Earlier this week, I’d been thinking and re-thinking about some negative things, and when the kids came home from school with a lot of demands all at once, I was flustered and curt.  I really didn’t think I was that negative, but Maggie said immediately, “Are you all right mom?  Can I do something to help you?”

     That helped me.  It made me realize that I had focused in the wrong direction.    I had gotten my emotions headed the wrong way.  God is big enough to solve everything that faces me.  I believe that with all my heart.  Still, I don’t always act on that with my thoughts.   I want a richer, more vibrant revision of me, so that my thoughts are always on “whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable–if anything is excellent or praiseworthy–think about such things.”  (Phillipians 4:8).

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s